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Disclaimer: BirthBabyBody exists to provide health and wellness resources. The information on this site is for educational and advocacy purposes only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical or psychological condition. Please consult your own care provider for individual advice regarding your specific situation and needs.

Christina McGee PT, DPT  is a physical therapist at Sullivan Physical Therapy, a pelvic floor specialty clinic in Austin, Texas. She received a bachelor of science in Athletic Training from University of Iowa and a Doctorate of Physical Therapy from University of Delaware.   Christina treats people of all genders and ages with bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction, as well as abdominal and pelvic pain. She has specific interests in pregnancy and postpartum care and is additionally the head of Sullivan Physical Therapy's pediatric bladder and bowel program and the Center Coordinator of Clinical Education. Christina  partners with Austin Area Birthing Center to provide pregnancy and postpartum physical therapy care as well as education to AABC clients on site. She is looking to pursue further education in sexual health counseling.

Meet Christina

What made you decide to become a physical therapist?

 

I love listening to people; to their struggles and frustrations and building a plan centered around factors that are important to them to meet their goals. My passion is in helping people understand what’s going on with their bodies, and ways they can take charge to get over their current challenge.

 

What is your wellness philosophy?

 

Your body wants to heal. We have to find a way to usher it back into a place where that can happen. Also, pelvic floor conditions are common, not normal. I say that all day, every day.

 

What inspires you?

 

Finding a practical path to a goal that really makes a change in someone’s self perception or quality of life.

 

What does being a mother mean to you?

Being a flexible leader. Nothing is always going to go right. In fact, rarely. Have a strong overall vision, and be very willing to change the strategy and don’t get buried in the details.

 

What do you think the hardest thing about motherhood is?

Enjoying the frustrating times. Because in the future, you’ll look back and think it was wonderful, not like you wanted to pull your hair out and quit.